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Full text of "Beauty and the Beast"

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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST, 



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ONCE upon a time a rich Merchant, meeting 
with heavy losses, had to retire to a small 
cottage, with his three daughters. The two 
elder grumbled at this ; but the youngest, named 
Beauty, tried to comfort her father and make 
his home happy. Once, when he was going on 
a journey, to try to mend his fortunes, the girls 
came to wish him good-bye ; the two elder told 
him to bring them some nice presents on his 
return, but Beauty merely begged of him to 
bring her a rose. When the Merchant was on 
his way back he saw some fine roses, and think- 
ing of Beauty, plucked the prettiest he could 
find. He had no sooner taken it than he saw 
a hideous Beast, armed with a deadly weapon. 
This fierce-looking creature asked him how he 
dared to touch his flowers, and talked of putting 
him to death. The Merchant pleaded that he 
only took the rose to please his daughter 
Beauty, who had begged of him to get her one. 
On this, the Beast said gruffly, "Well, I will 
not take your life, if you will bring one of your 
daughters here to die in your stead. She must 
come willingly, or I will not have her. You 



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2 Beauty and the Beast. 

may stay and rest in my palace until to-morrow." 
Although the Merchant found an excellent 
supper laid for him, he could not eat ; nor could 
he sleep, although everything was made ready 
for his comfort. The next morning he set out 
on a handsome horse, provided by the Beast. 

When he came near his house his children 
came out to greet him. But seeing the sad- 
ness of his face, and his eyes filled with tears, 
they asked the cause of his trouble. Giving 
Beauty the rose, he told her all. The two 
elder sisters laid all the blame on Beauty ; but 
his sons, who had come from the forest to meet 
him, declared that they would go to the Beast 
instead. But Beauty said that as she was the 
cause of this misfortune, she alone must suffer 
for it, and was quite willing to go; and, in 
spite of the entreaties of her brothers, who 
loved her dearly, she set out with her father, 
to the secret joy of her two envious sisters. 

When they arrived at the palace the doors 
opened of themselves ; sweet music was heard, 
and they walked into a room where supper 
was prepared. Just as they had eaten their 
supper, the Beast entered, and said in a mild 
tone, " Beauty, did you come here willingly to 
die in place of your father?" "Willingly," she 
answered, with a trembling voice. "So much 
the better for you," said the Beast ; "your father 



3 Beauty and the Beast. 

can stay here to-night, but must go home on 
the following morning." Beauty tried to cheer 
her father, at parting, by saying that she would 
try to soften the heart of the Beast, and get 
him to let her return home soon. After he 
was gone, she went into a fine room, on the 
door of which was written, in letters of gold, 
" Beauty's Room ; " and lying on the table was 
a portrait of herself, under which were these 
words: ''Beauty is Queen here; all things will 
obey her." All her meals were served to the 
sound of music, and at supper-time the Beast, 
drawing the curtains aside, would walk in, and 
talk so pleasantly that she soon lost much of 
her fear of him. At last, he turned towards 
her, and said, "Am I so very ugly?" "Yes, 
indeed you are," replied Beauty, " but then 
you are so kind that I don't mind your looks." 
"Will you marry me, then?" asked he. Beauty, 
looking away, said, " Pray don't ask me." He 
then bade her "Good-night" with a sad voice, 
and she retired to her bed-chamber. 

The palace was full of galleries and apart- 
ments, containing the most beautiful works 
of art. In one room was a cage filled with 
rare birds. Not far from this room she saw a 
numerous troop of monkeys of all sizes. They 
advanced to meet her, making her low bows. 
Beauty was much pleased with them, and said 



Beauty and the Beast. 4 

she would like some of them to follow her and 
keep her company. Instantly two tall young 
apes, in court dresses, advanced, and placed 
themselves with great gravity beside her, and 
two sprightly little monkeys took up her train 
as pages. From this time the monkeys always 
waited upon her with all the attention and 
respect that officers of a royal household are 
accustomed to pay to queens. 

Beauty was now, in fact, quite the Queen of 
the palace, and all her wishes were gratified; 
but, excepting at supper-time, she was always 
alone; the Beast then appeared, and behaved 
so agreeably that she liked him more and more. 
But to his question, " Beauty, will you marry 
me ? " he never could get any other answer than 
a shake of the head from her, on which he 
always took his leave very sadly. 

Although Beauty had everything she could 
wish for she was not happy, as she could not 
forget her father, and brothers, and sisters. At 
last, one evening, she begged so hard of the 
Beast to let her go home that he agreed to her 
wish, on her promising not to stay away longer 
than two months, and gave her a ring, telling 
her to place it on her dressing-table whenever 
she desired to go or to return ; and then showed 
her where to find suitable clothes, as well as 
presents to take home. The poor Beast was more 



Beauty and the Beast, 5 

sad than ever. She tried to cheer him, saying, 
" Beauty will soon return," but nothing seemed 
to comfort him. Beauty then went to her room, 
and before retiring to rest she took care to 
place the ring on the dressing-table. When 
she awoke next morning, what was her joy at 
finding herself in her father's house, with the 
gifts and clothes from the palace at her bed-side. 

At first she wondered where she was ; but 
she soon heard the voice of her father, and, 
rushing out, she flung her arms round his 
neck. The father and daughter had much to 
say to each other. Beauty related all that had 
happened to her at the palace. Her father, 
enriched by the liberality of the Beast, had left 
his old house, and now lived in a very large 
city, and her sisters were engaged to be mar- 
ried to young men of good family. 

When she had passed some weeks with her 
family. Beauty found that her sisters, who were 
secretly vexed at her good fortune, still looked 
upon her as a rival, and treated her with 
coldness. Besides this, she remembered her 
promise to the Beast, and resolved to return to 
him. But her father and brothers begged her 
to stay a day or two longer, and she could 
not resist their entreaties. But one night she 
dreamed that the poor Beast was lying dead 
in the palace garden ; she awoke in a fright, 



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Beauty and the Beast, 6 

looked for her ring, and placed it on the table. 
In the morning she was at the Palace again, 
but the Beast was nowhere to be found : at last 
she ran to the place in the garden that she 
had dreamed about, and there, sure enough, the 
poor Beast was, lying senseless on his back. 

At this sight Beauty wept and reproached 
herself for having caused his death. She ran to 
a fountain and sprinkled his face with water. 
The Beast opened his eyes, and as soon as he 
could speak, he said, sorrowfully, " Now that 
I see you once more, I die contented." " No, 
no ! " she cried, " you shall not die ! Oh, live to 
be my husband, and Beauty will be your faith- 
ful wife ! " The moment she had uttered these 
words, a dazzling light shone everywhere; the 
Palace windows glittered with lamps, and music 
was heard around. To her great wonder, a 
handsome young Prince stood before her, who 
said that her words had broken the spell of a 
magician, by which he had been doomed to 
wear the form of a Beast, until a beautiful girl 
should love him in spite of his ugliness. The 
grateful Prince now claimed Beauty as his wife. 
The Merchant was soon informed of his 
daughter's good fortune, and the Prince was 
married to Beauty on the following day. 



::o firm surpasses Messrs. Routledge in Sixpenny and Shilling Picture Story-Books. Could not be better drawn niinted 
or coloi^ed, if they cost twenty shillings instead of twelve pence."— 77/<r Standard, Dec. 23, 1870. 



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ROUTLEDGE'S 



[SHILLING TOY BOOKS. 

I^I/'/77/ LJ\nGE ILLUCTRATIOI^JS BY H. S. MAZ::^, d. D WATSOt^ H WEIR 
WALTER CRAM, F. Xt:Z, & E G. D., ' ' ' 

Printc .urs by Kronhelm & Co., Leighton Brothers, Edmund Eva.ns, and 

Dalziel Brothers. 

In Demy 4to., Stiff Wraj-per, Is. ea^^i : or Mm,vtprl , .• T.ir,er-. oq_ gacix. 



24. 

25- 

26. 

= 7- 
28. 
29. 
30- 
31. 
3 2. 

34- 

35- 
36. 
37 



NLKSERY RHYMES. 

ALPHABET OF TRADES. 

CINDERELLA.* 

ALPHABET OF PRETTV NAMES. 

OLD TESTAMENT ALPHABET. 

THE THREE LI'lTLE KITTE.\S. 

THIS LITTLE PIG WENT TO \' ^ > t" 

TOM THUMB'S ALPHABET. 

NURSERY SONGS. 

NEW TESTAMENl- ALPHABi:!'. 

OUR FARMYARD ALPHABET. 

THE HISTORY OF MOSKS. 

THE HISTORY OF JOSEPH. 

THE ALPHABET OF FLOWERK 

NURSERY RHYMES. 

NURSERY GAMES. 

THE LIFE OF OUR LORD. 

THE THREE BE.\RS. 

LITTLE RED RUJING HOOD. 

NEW TALE Oh A TUB.* 

NURSERY 'lALES. 

OLD MOTHER HUBBARD. 

PICTURES FROM ENGLISH HISTOi" 



Ditto 
Ditto 
Ditto 
PUSS IN BOOTS. 
TOM THTTMB. 
BABES IN THE WOOD. 
JACR AND THE BEANSTALK. 
THE LAUGHABLE A B C. 
WILD ANIMALS, First Scries.* 
Ditto Second Series.* 

Ditto Third Series.* 

Ditto Fourth Series.* 



Second Period. 
Third Period. 
Fourth Period. 



J',i I .'■: ANIMALS, First .Series.* 

40- Ditio Second o-ric;.* 

41- Dit'.o Third Series. ' 

42- Ditto Fourth' Scries. '•> 
44- MY MOTHER. 

45. 'lilH DOGS' DI;;NER l^\RTY. 
4". LITl'LE DOG TRUSTY. 
4/. THE WHITE CAT. 

50. DASH AND THE DUCKLING.S. 

51. REYNARD THE FOX. 

52. A\ I'HADET CF FAIRY TALES. 
5.:. TIITUMS AKD FIDO. 

54. ANN AND HER MAMMA. 

55. THE CATS' TEA PARTY. 

56. BABY. 

57. HEN NY PENNY. 

58. THE PEACOCK AT HOME, 

59- THE SLEEPING BEAUTY IN THE WOOD. 

60. THE TOY PRIMER. 

61. THE PET LAMB. 

62. THE FAIR ONE WITH THE GOLDEN LOCKS. 

63. JACK THE GL\NT KILLER, 

64. ROBINSON CRUSOE. 

65. COCK SPARROW'S CHRIS'IM.'S. 

66. QUEER CHARACTERS. 

67. A:S0P'S FABLES. 

68. ROBIN'S CHRISTMAS SONG. 

69. THE LION'S RECEPTIO.NT. 

70. THE FROG PRINCE. 

71. GOODY TWO SHOES. 

72. BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. 

73- ALPHABET OF OLD FRIENDS. 

74- GINGERBREAD. 

75. OLD NURSi:RY RHYMES, with thk Old Tunes. 
77w« mariid wilk ert Atltruk (*) are NOT kipt on Linen. 



GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS. 



■BMinia iT^vn, 



a una t*o »M<]iTa«. %x<tm oobit, »t»ii» •Ttxiu.